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November 18, 2013
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Chekhov's Armoury Part I by wingsofwrath Chekhov's Armoury Part I by wingsofwrath
First part of a series on the small arms of the Inner Space world.

The weapon from up-world is a coil gun firing electro-plastic spherical pellets that deform into aerodynamically stable projectiles when passing down the barrel and also gain an electrical charge to deliver an incapacitating electroshock effect at the target. Muzzle velocity is variable on wherever the weapon is fired at an armoured or an anarmoured target and is controlled by an internal computer. Sighting and control is done either via wireless data connection to the shooter's retinal and cranial implants and helmet display, or alternatively, through controls on the actual weapon and pop-up iron sights.

The three down-world pistols are all civilian rather than government designs and thus come in two distinct calibres, both semi-caseless -the charge is situated inside the body of the projectile like the real world 9X24.5mm AUPO Benelli.

The two rifles are both Marbanians government designs set apart by several decades of weapon evolution, but both now thoroughly obsolete so present only on the civilian market - the top one is a second to last generation selfloading rifle with a box magazine using modern caseless ammunition, while the lower one is an early single shot breech-loader with "traditional" brass cartridge center-fire ammunition. Both use smokeless powder though.
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:iconskeenlangly:
SkeeNLangly Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2014
verry interesting
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:iconwillsormiston:
Willsormiston Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013
I'm glad you made something based on the beloved 'Broomhandle' Mauser. Is the front of no.5 based on the M1928 variant Thompson by any chance?
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:iconwingsofwrath:
wingsofwrath Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Actually, it was based more on the barrel of the Czech ZB-26 Machinegun, used in WW2 by the Romanian and German armies and also the basis for the British Bren.
And yeah, I really love the Mauser C96 "Broomhandle".  I believe it was also Winston Churchill's favourite gun.
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:icon1wyrmshadow1:
1Wyrmshadow1 Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013
I definitely recognized that "coil gun" as the Korobov TKB-022 assault rifle
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:iconwingsofwrath:
wingsofwrath Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Good eye! :D
It's obviously not an exact copy of the TKB-022PM since it needed to be adapted into a coilgun, but I tried to stay as close as possible to the source gun, because it has such a deliciously retro-futurist shape.
And you can rest assured the whole sci-fi part of the Inner Space arsenal will be featuring a lot of Korobov's designs, because I like to believe Vinarian and Letarian weapons designers have a sense of humour and a fondness for the distant past... 
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:icontedshatner10:
TedShatner10 Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013
Why is the Coilgun Mk. IX a firearm from the 2040s, while the other fire arms are from the 1940s?
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:iconwingsofwrath:
wingsofwrath Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Well, because the whole idea behind Inner Space is that there are two technologically dissimilar civilizations that come into contact and eventually conflict. One of them is technologically advanced - I call it conventionally "up-world" (you said "2040s", but it's technology level is closer to 2140s)- and the other is quite dieselpunk and I call it "down-world" (as you well remarked, 1940s technology level).
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:iconcthelmax:
cthelmax Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013
Is the rate of fire on a semi-auto rifle with 20 round mags really so great as to justify the expense of cooling fins on the barrel, or is there some other design principle at work?  (And while I'm at it; recoil, gas, or blowback(!) operated?)
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:iconwingsofwrath:
wingsofwrath Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
It really doesn't, but it was the first weapon that used the new cast caseless ammunition and the designers were worried about the fact it developed a much higher temperature than earlier propellants.  Basically, the down-world Inner Space arms race started with the standard brass cartridges, but then they discovered a tree resin endemic to this world that, when mixed with nitrates, not only could produce a more stable but powerful compound but it also resulted in a gel like product which then hardened.  This allowed them to cast the propellant into mounds and incorporate the bullet and primer at the same time, removing the requirement for a brass casing.

The Govt. Type VI rifle uses a delayed blowback mechanism, but had a rather short service life, of it's rather complicated mechanism and especially it's two part bolt which was very susceptible to jamming. The bolt is comprised of two parts - an outer one to which the charging handle is attached and which moves only when arming the rifle or after the last round is fired at which point it locks open, and an inner part which moves along a spiral path inside of the outer part and which performs the chambering of new rounds, the spiral motion ensuring both the locking-unlocking of the lugs as well as providing the necessary delay for functioning of the mechanism. In case of a jam the shooter can cycle the jammed round out by pulling back on the charging handle.
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:iconcthelmax:
cthelmax Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013
Thats... not a mechanism for the faint of heart XD  Clearing the jammed round must be interesting too, unless each bullet is provided with a machined groove that an extractor can grip (and then, you'd need a way for said ejector to be moved out of the way when the round is fired, unless you wanted it to tear part of the round off)

Still, at least you don't have the heat-dissipation problems of a true caseless system - I seem to remember reading somewhere that a brass cartridge case carries away 90% of the heat generated by firing (I don't vouch for the accuracy of my memory, mind, so I'd take the number with a pinch of salt).
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