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RNAS Armoured Train by wingsofwrath RNAS Armoured Train by wingsofwrath
This is a British Armoured Train design for Shadowless, based on real life armoured trains operated by the RNAS (Royal Naval Air Service, the air arm of the Royal Navy) in Belgium during the early part of WW1.
Most of the cars are either copies of real life examples from the 1890s or based upon them and modified as the story requires.
One such example is the "Ordnance BL 20 inch Railway Howitzer", which is an enlarged mash-up of the real life 1918 "Ordnance BL 18 inch howitzer on truck, railway" and the 1915 "Ordnance BL 12 inch Gun Mk IX".

Since this drawing is primarily meant as reference for the comic, I only drew the different type of cars and not the way they fit into the completed convoy. In operation, the actual car order would be: 1_2_3_4_8_9_6_6_5_5_5_5_5g_5g_5g_10_7, where "5g" is a "gunpowder van", similar to the general goods van but with the sides made out of steel plate instead of wood (for obvious reasons).
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:iconrealevilcorgi:
realevilcorgi Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Battle trains.
I am 100% okay with everything about this.
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:iconwaltsland:
waltsland Featured By Owner Jun 25, 2014  Student Filmographer
WELL DONE, JAP, GOOD FORM! I LOVE RALWAY STUFF AND I LOVE , I LOVE STEMIES.
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:iconjdunk1971:
JDunk1971 Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2014
Its interesting that the Royal naval officer who designed the first armored train was then Captain John Fisher, who as First Sea Lord helped inspire the design of the HMS Deadnought.
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:icontrainmanauxl1:
trainmanauxl1 Featured By Owner May 8, 2014
...and then they brought in the railgun...show offs.
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:icontracks147:
tracks147 Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
EPIC TRAIN BATTLE OF HISTORY
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:iconenrico1946:
Enrico1946 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
I checked some of this on the Armored Trains Book recently now i see why it looked familiar, Good Job dude :D :D
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:iconwaffle0708:
Waffle0708 Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
ohhhhh I love you, you are awesome....
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:iconarmored-cross187:
Armored-Cross187 Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Would this happen to be a Single train?

or just the parts of armored trains in the royal navy? 
Because I don't see that little steam engine pulling ALL OF THAT. you got to admit that railway gun is a MONSTER to move...
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:iconwingsofwrath:
wingsofwrath Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
You are severely underestimating the capabilities of train engines. 

The "Claud Hamilton" class (LNER Class D14 or GER S46) 4-4-0 engine has a tractive effort of 76,040 N (17,095 lbf, if you prefer imperial measurements). Typical train freight train composition for this era was 42 fully laden 10-ton two axle cars for a total of 475 gross tons (so including the weight of the train itself, or "tare", not just of the freight being shipped) for the entire convoy, including locomotive.

As can be inferred from the above, the weight of the locomotive itself is 55 tons normal (including fully laden tender) and 95 after armouring with 12mm plate, while the weight of the armoured cars is 30 tons for the larger, bogie ones and 12 for the two-axle command car.  The howitzer itself is 115 tons, of which 85 are in the barrel and breech itself.  The rest of the train cars are between 8 and 10t each, because they are standard freight cars.

Putting it all together (according to the train composition given in the description) we get a total train weight of 362 gross tons, which, as you saw from the above figures, is well in the capabilities of the "little steam engine".
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:iconpaddle-steamer:
Paddle-Steamer Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2015
Indeed, many overestimate the power needed to pull a train, it's actually not that hard to pull something with wheels over a smooth surface like rails. Once it gets going from a standing stop it becomes significantly easier to keep it going, as the train's momentum will lean towards keeping it going. Indeed it's often far harder to stop a train than it is to get it going.

Likewise steam engines had a lot of torque while operating at lower RMPs, allowing them to get going from a stop fairly well, even with only two cylinders.


This is a neat armoured train concept while maintaining a degree of historically accuracy. I'm writing a AU WWI story and I intend to include a British armoured train and stumbled upon your picture while researching them. Certainly makes it easier to describe with a nice visualisation like this, as most of the historical photos are fairly limited in view. Clap 
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:iconcthelmax:
cthelmax Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013
Very nice ^^  The only think missing as far as I can see is an ammunition carriage for the 20" howitzer
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:iconwingsofwrath:
wingsofwrath Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Actually, unlike the French Army, for example, in the British one there never was a "dedicated" ammunition van for the big howitzers even in real life. Instead the shells were carried inside standard general goods vans (no.5 on the drawing and there are 4 in the convoy, but I only drew one to save on space) and the charges themselves inside special "gunpowder vans" (if available, of course) which look similar to the regular goods vans but their sides are clad in sheet metal and are painted black with a huge red "X" on the door (3 in the convoy).
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:iconcthelmax:
cthelmax Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013
That's interesting, I've got a book with a picture of a 12" Mark IX railway gun attached to an ammunition van; the van has doors in the an end so that ammo can be easily transferred to the narrow-gauge ammunition handling railway on the gun mount itself.
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:iconwingsofwrath:
wingsofwrath Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
To be frank, I'm far from an expert on this subject since I only skimmed it (not particularly relevant to the comic, since we never get to see much of the actual firing cycle of the howitzer, it serves more as a MacGuffin to the story) but I do think the British never actually had a purpose built ammunition van like the French used for their howitzers. Depending on where that picture was taken it could either be a field mod of the normal goods van or even one of the French ones if during WW1.
Also, some goods vans (like the one I drew) already have end-on doors, so there is no point in constructing a specialised one where a normal would do.
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:iconcthelmax:
cthelmax Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013
Well, after some quick googling it appears that the picture in my book is a painting based off of upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia… , which in turn is based off upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia… , so it's hard to say how accurate the pic is.

As to the merits of constructing a dedicated van; I agree it seems a little excessive considering a standard goods van could do the job (Although cladding the outside in steel plate would probably be considered a sensible step for a carriage full of powder pulled by a steam locomotive...)
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:iconwingsofwrath:
wingsofwrath Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Hmm. The plot thickens.
It's interesting that the ammunition van in the picture uses bogies, so the design looks decidedly un-British, because most British rolling stock of the time had single axles.
On the other hand, after some intensive googling, I am now also aware of some designs built during WW1 for the War Department by the firms of "Robert Hudson" & "Rendel Palmer & Tritton" on the French "Decauville" narrow gauge military railway system and which did use bogies. Also, the original RNAS armoured train I patterned mine on had bogies as well, but that one was built on the continent using Belgian rolling stock.
So at this point, I really don't know - it might be that is indeed a British design I've never heard about (neither of the sources I could find mention anything like that, but who knows?) or else they're using a French ammunition van.

This is also interesting - turns out that there were also "regular" general goods vans that were manufactured out of steel plate on a steel frame (so not just "clad" as I initially surmised) and they look identical with the gunnpowder vans. At this point it's a toss-up on wherever the gunpowder vans were simply regular steel vans with locks on, or the others were unneeded gunpowder vans used for other things...
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:iconcthelmax:
cthelmax Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013
Interesting...  Sadly, I suspect that the only way to find out the truth would be to rummage through the archives of the Royal Artillery (assuming that the paperwork hasn't been lost over the intervening years).

Personally (and this is pure speculation on my part) I'd be inclined to say that the gunpowder vans were steel vans with locks and a paint scheme, since there are after all cargoes besides gunpowder that you would want to transport in fireproof carriages; however I have absolutely nothing to support this belief.
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:iconwingsofwrath:
wingsofwrath Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Pretty much.

Yeah, I'm leaning the same way, that the vans existed and some of them were also used for carrying gunpowder rather than the other way around.
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(1 Reply)
:iconthedragon1998:
Thedragon1998 Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013
That last wagon......
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